The verdict

As We Fall was released in Polish this February, titled Straceńcy.

Poland is the first country outside Norway to present the second part of the Fredrik Beier-saga to its crime reading audience. And the reception is overwhelming. Here are the words from ten leading literature bloggers:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s a collection of reviews and points, given by a large number of Polish readers on the bookreader site lubimyczytac.pl

 

Full frontal obscurity

In mid august, Sweden will be the eleventh country to release Those Who F0llow, under it´s Swedish name Det Hemliga Brödraskapet Från Wien(AKA Wienerbrorskapet, Gli Adepti, Követök, Wieniläisveljeskunta, Nasladowcy, Viedenske Bratstvo, Videnske Bratrstvo, Wienerbroderskabet, Viini vennaskondand and Les Adeptes.)

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bookshelf view

The Swedish release means that Those Who Follow now have been introduced to readers in more than half of the 20 countries that have bought the publishing rights – so far.

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Full frontal

So, what does Those Who Follow look like? A lot of things, obviously. Readers are different, markets are different, and what looks like a front for a crime novel in Oslo might look quite different in Warszawa, Prag or Copenhagen. As you can see from the picture to the right, there are a few similarities, though. France and Denmark have chosen a cover that I have loved from the moment I saw it. It´s the one with the staring eyes, made by the Danish designer Simon Lilholt. Finland and Slovakia are also thinking in similar ways, with a picture that captures the historic side of the novel – nazi researchers doing their terrible experiments. There is an underlaying brutality in those covers, that I believe captures an important side of the story. If you study them closely (as I have done) you will see that it is not the same picture, but they are probably from the same series. The Norwegian front (left corner, bottom) is also inspired by the parts of the novel describing racial hygiene and eugenics during the 30’s and 40’s.

So which ones do I prefer? Ha ha. Im not gonna tell. I love them all, of course, as if they were my kids. And – as with kids – some you adore from the minute you see them, some you love even more, when you get to know them.

 

Terrorism, soup and Fredrik Beier

In what way did real-life events have an effect on «Those Who FSkjermbilde 2016-04-05 kl. 09.46.22ollow»? 

This week I was interviewed by Poland´s largest web portal, onet.pl and by the the Gazeta´s weekend magazine.

We talked about a tragic murder in Sweden, immigration, terrorism and how making a good soup is comparable to writing a crime novel.

You can read the interviews here: 

Gazeta: Brutalne morderstwo i religijny fanatyzm. Fenomen skandynawskich kryminałów

Onet: Problemu terroryzmu nie da się rozwiązać poprzez zabijanie terrorystów

(both in Polish / google-translatish)

 

The Polish Vote

After its release in Poland, Naśladowcy (Those Who Follow) is getting a very warm welcome.1455696442_iSnJuh1K8Mu6_400_auto

Just look what onet.pl, Poland´s largest web portal has to say about Naśladowcy in their review:

«Although the Scandinavian crime fiction authors are known throughout the world, Johnsrud definitely stands out among them. 

(…)

Those Who Follow have everything needed for a good detective story – charismatic heroes, well-constructed story and an interesting historical plot.

Ingar Johnsrud just joined the pantheon of such masters of the genre like Jo Nesbø and Camilla Läckberg.»

Polish lovers of crime-lit read a lot, and you guys really know your way around the genre.

It is therefore such a pleasure to see that several bloggers and readers are also enjoying the first novel about police officers Fredrik Beier and Kafa Iqbal

Here are a few reviews (all in Polish):

Naśladowcy is released by Publishing House Otwarte, and they have made this site and video. Pretty neat!